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The Blues Guitar Player

Joe Bonamassa – From Child Prodigy to Modern-Day Blues-Rock Hero

Joe Bonamassa is considered by many to be the top blues guitarist of the present generation.  While most musicians his age draw influences from the ‘80s and ‘90s bands they grew up with, Bonamassa grew up listening to his parents’ classic rock records, a great foundation for any budding blues-rocker.  His solo career may just… Continue reading Joe Bonamassa – From Child Prodigy to Modern-Day Blues-Rock Hero

Howlin’ Wolf – The Loudest (and Largest) Man in Chicago Blues History

If he didn’t scare the heck out of you, he’d make a lifelong fan out of you instead.  That’s perhaps the best way to describe the legacy of Chester Arthur Burnett, better known as Howlin’ Wolf.  With his imposing size and extremely loud vocal delivery, Howlin’ Wolf was not somebody you would want to trifle… Continue reading Howlin’ Wolf – The Loudest (and Largest) Man in Chicago Blues History

Keb’ Mo’ – He’s Mo’ than Just a Bluesman

The name may sound a bit unorthodox to the uninitiated, but Keb’ Mo’ (born Kevin Moore) is a household name in the modern blues scene.  Though he was born well after the heyday of many great Delta blues musicians, the roots of Keb’ Mo’s sound dates back to a simpler time in American blues history,… Continue reading Keb’ Mo’ – He’s Mo’ than Just a Bluesman

Muddy Waters – King of the Chicago Blues Scene

B.B. King may be the undisputed king of blues to a lot of us, but when it comes to the Chicago blues scene, Muddy Waters is still arguably the greatest Windy City bluesman ever.  And his influence has transcended generations – the Rolling Stones got their name from one of his songs, and Jimi Hendrix… Continue reading Muddy Waters – King of the Chicago Blues Scene

Elmore James – The Undisputed King of the Slide Guitar

You can’t think of the blues without thinking of the slide guitar.  And you can’t think of slide guitar without Elmore James, the legendary Chicago bluesman who hit it big in the early ‘50s with two amped-up covers of Robert Johnson standards.  These songs, “Dust My Broom” and “Standing at the Crossroads” may sound nearly… Continue reading Elmore James – The Undisputed King of the Slide Guitar

John Lee Hooker – The Boogie Man is Real!

With a career spanning a good seven decades, John Lee Hooker is best known to fans as the master of boogie-woogie blues.  His was a form of blues you could dance to, something you can’t say about many of his contemporaries.   He preferred to keep things simple when playing the guitar, focusing on the rhythm… Continue reading John Lee Hooker – The Boogie Man is Real!

Robben Ford – Sideman, Bluesman and Jazzman Extraordinaire

Ever since he formed his first band in 1969, Robben Ford has had a colorful, yet underrated career.  He has had the privilege to play with a variety of artists, from jazz musicians like Miles Davis to hard rockers such as KISS.  Yet his roots have always been the blues, and that’s arguably what he… Continue reading Robben Ford – Sideman, Bluesman and Jazzman Extraordinaire

Jimi Hendrix – Possibly the Greatest Rock Guitarist Ever

It’s hard to define a truly iconic moment in the career of James Marshall Hendrix, known otherwise to friends, family and fans as Jimi Hendrix.   Did it happen at the end of the Monterey Pop Festival in June 1967?  Was it that legendary version of the Star-Spangled Banner at Woodstock?  Or maybe one of his… Continue reading Jimi Hendrix – Possibly the Greatest Rock Guitarist Ever

Stevie Ray Vaughan – The Pride and Joy of Texas Blues

On August 27, 1990, Texan blues-rocker Stevie Ray Vaughan, better known to his fans as SRV, passed away in a helicopter crash.  This was a man who had conquered his demons just a few years prior to his tragic death, coming back stronger than ever and becoming well-known to fans of different musical genres.  And… Continue reading Stevie Ray Vaughan – The Pride and Joy of Texas Blues

Otis Rush – The Unlucky Lefty of the Chicago Blues Scene

Despite influencing blues-rock legends in waiting like Eric Clapton and Michael Bloomfield, Otis Rush hasn’t gotten the accolades and success many other ‘50s-‘60s Chicago blues mainstays have.  That hasn’t made him any less influential, though.  He recorded some definite blues classics in the ‘50s, such as “I Can’t Quit You, Baby” and “Double Trouble”, and… Continue reading Otis Rush – The Unlucky Lefty of the Chicago Blues Scene